Dennis Wright's Blog

British Open Show Jumping Championships 2009

Posted in Equestrianism, Family Outings, Sport by Dennis Wright on May 3, 2009

On 19 April, Naomi, Esther and I went to the British Open show jumping at the LG Arena, NEC Birmingham. To my surprise, photography (without flash) was allowed. Well flash would have been useless at the distances involved anyway.

Some of my pictures from the event, starting with French trainer Jean-François Pignon.

Then the preparations for the grand final showjumping event.

Robert Whitaker on Lacroix 9

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6 Responses

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  1. Beno said, on November 5, 2013 at 5:36 pm

    started writing my life story. am 60 yrs. old, aslmot, and have been an alcoholic, addict for 43 years. funny, but when i sat down to type, the first thing that came to me was my insatiable desire to eat sweets and sugar as a young girl. so i googled it and found you. thankyou so much for verifying what i was thinking. just incase my book ever gets published, remember . . . you were a part of my story and maybe a part of my recovery from my sugar addiction which i have not yet addressed. thankyou and good luck. good work!!!

  2. new car insurance quotes online said, on September 6, 2013 at 3:49 pm

    Fell out of bed feeling down. This has brightened my day!

  3. viegra said, on June 25, 2013 at 7:01 am

    There are many reasons that I agree with the authors that addiction is a chronic condition. Chronic refers to it being a long lasting, pervasive condition that impacts one’s life and dictates his or her lifestyle. I subscribe to the notion that recovery is not only abstinence from substances but a way of living that best keeps the condition of addiction at bay. A person with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome knows what he or she needs to do to live his or her life to the fullest while acknowledging the existence of the condition. This means that the person may not be able to participate in certain activities and may need to schedule his or her day around laying down or napping. This is not any different from a person suffering from addiction who avoids people places and things that will exacerbate the addiction. The person with an addiction may schedule his or her day around going to meetings or treatment. Because addiction is chronic, I as a counselor would help my clients to make lifestyle changes to avoid triggers and situations in which they would be set up to fail. I would help them learn skills to cope with triggers and cravings, as well as encouraging creating clean and sober relationships rather than hanging out with old using buddies.

  4. cars insurance low cost said, on June 17, 2013 at 7:10 am

    I agree with the notion of addiction as being chronic and believe it is important to maintain a holistic vision in working with clients who present with addiction. In addition to the three strategies and emerging approaches mentioned by Dennis and Scott (p.48-51), I am inclined to get the whole family involved to more effectively work through the multiple influences and reciprocal affects that addiction can have on family members.On the macro, institutions and our society at large need to normalize conversations about addiction with our youth from a young age to promote prevention and support early intervention. This requires engagement in community dialogue and policy change.My favorite piece was the Weegmann and English article because it beautifully articulated how the construction of a new identity can promote sustainable change. A focus on replacing the addiction with movement towards the achievement of goals, values, and who an individual wants to be, may be important in this process. In many ways, the one in recovery is going through a grieving process in the same way one might feel if they lost a best friend or lover. Addressing the relational aspect of addiction and attachment issues will be important to incorporate into therapy. An inherent part of detachment relates to spirituality for me (even if we don’t want to use that term) because ultimately it comes down to the recognition that all our worldly attachments are transient, and demands a person to turn themselves toward the unseen, a transcendent power, or a higher purpose of some kind.

  5. auto cheap insurance rate said, on June 17, 2013 at 7:10 am

    I agree with the notion of addiction as being chronic and believe it is important to maintain a holistic vision in working with clients who present with addiction. In addition to the three strategies and emerging approaches mentioned by Dennis and Scott (p.48-51), I am inclined to get the whole family involved to more effectively work through the multiple influences and reciprocal affects that addiction can have on family members.On the macro, institutions and our society at large need to normalize conversations about addiction with our youth from a young age to promote prevention and support early intervention. This requires engagement in community dialogue and policy change.My favorite piece was the Weegmann and English article because it beautifully articulated how the construction of a new identity can promote sustainable change. A focus on replacing the addiction with movement towards the achievement of goals, values, and who an individual wants to be, may be important in this process. In many ways, the one in recovery is going through a grieving process in the same way one might feel if they lost a best friend or lover. Addressing the relational aspect of addiction and attachment issues will be important to incorporate into therapy. An inherent part of detachment relates to spirituality for me (even if we don’t want to use that term) because ultimately it comes down to the recognition that all our worldly attachments are transient, and demands a person to turn themselves toward the unseen, a transcendent power, or a higher purpose of some kind.

  6. Robert said, on May 28, 2013 at 11:35 pm

    Thank you Karen for bringing such ioraptmnt stuff to our attention.. Living on W.Coast (Langley BC) feel very isolated from EC and all going’s on.Eventing riders trying to qualify for our O team are required to be on E.Coast for 4 months at THEIR own expense- transportation costs, accommodation horse/rider/groom, food, vet bills, entry fees, and the stress of leaving your home, dogs, partners, family behind Didn’t see post from EC; was there any mention of great results of Rebecca Howard 2nd and Hawley Bennett 6th out of 60+ entries in *** at the Fork against all the best in the US? You are right! if our own association doesn’t mention our Olympic hopefuls -HOW will we ever get press, recognition from our local papers/news? Thank YOU for bringing this information to light!


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